Kamakura Day Trip – Japan Travel Experience

Donnie: What's up guys? Today we are at Kamakura Station, so insteadof doing one of the longer trips, we're gonna do a day trip today but it's gonna be justas fun.

So we're not gonna really look at the hotelor any of that stuff, we're just gonna go check out some of the shrines and the sightsand then we're gonna have a ton of street food.

Okay? So take me hand, take it.

I meant them.

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A sando is a road that approachesa shrine and just about every shrine has one of some sort, but this happens to be the longest sando that I've ever been on, it's 1.

8 kilometers long.

So Wakamiya Oji leads up to Tsurugaoka Hachimanguand there are three Torii Gates, and we're standing in front of the third one which isright over there.

Donnie: Pop quiz boys and girls, we're on the road to Hachimangu Shrine, which bridge do we take, the right one, the middleone or the left one? O, what do you think? Which bridge should we take? No.

This one? Nope, no.

Not .

.

.

No.

This one or this one.

Not this one.

Got it? Because this one, this bridge right here, that was used by only the Shogun, so that's Akabashi, so that curved bridge was only forthe Shogun.

This one and this one, is for the commonersand that's us.

Donnie: I know this isn't the street foodplace but man, everything smells so good here, I'm trying to make it through this gauntletjust to get to the shrine.

It smells so good.

Oh man, I know I'm gonna gain some weightafter today, because this isn't even the street for it.

But it's so good, it smells so good.

Donnie: Kamakura has many, many many shrines, but built in 1063, Hachimangu is probably Kamakura's most famous shrine.

My brain works in a weird way so bear withme.

When I heard the Hachiman in Hachimangu, doyou know what I thought of? This little cartoon called The ThunderCatsthat I used to watch when I was a kid.

Because there was a character on the ThunderCatscalled, Hachiman, and Hachiman had this legendary sword called The Thunder-Cutter.

And this sword was just as powerful if notmore powerful than another legendary sword called The Sword of Omens.

So getting back to the point, Hachiman inJapanese folklore is the god of war.

So this shrine, Hachimangu, at least originallywas devoted to the god of war, or the protector of warriors.

Donnie: Now I can finally say I've been toHachimangu, let's hit up our next spot.

Donnie: I'm not exactly sure why but thiswas my favorite part of the day trip.

It just had this peaceful vibe to it and thereweren't a lot of people there and this is the kind of stuff that I like aside from thefood that we're gonna be eating in the next video.

Donnie: This is The Bamboo Forest at Hokokuji, and I've never been in The Bamboo Forest before so come with me, let's go together.

Hokokuji Temple, in The Bamboo Forest, having matcha green tea, and there are sweets that go with it so .

.

.

O, I'm supposed toeat this first, right? Okay.

So I'm gonna take a bite.

Okay.

Melts in your mouth there.

And in the Karate Kid II movie, he like turns, remember? You guys don't remember that movie.

I'm aging myself here.

Okay.

That's really good though.

There is so much to tea ceremoniesand tea drinking in Japan, it's an actual traditional art form and I don't know a wholelot about it to be honest but what I learned from the explanation I was given is that it'sall about these nuances, the way you hold your bowl, the way you turn the bowl so thatway you're not drinking from a certain face, the time you take to pause after eating thewasanbon, the time you take to pause after drinking the tea.

It seems like this really formal way to showthat you truly appreciate the entire process of drinking tea.

But again, I don't know a lot about it butI do find it fascinating.

Donnie: We're making a little cookie detourto the Hato Sabure shop, and I haven't been to Kamakura in like seven years, and that'sthe last time I had one of these cookies and I really enjoyed them or I remember enjoyingthem back in the day when I came, so let's get some more.

So it's these cookies that are shaped likedoves and they're very very famous cookies in Kamakura.

So if you ever find yourself in Kamakura, you better stop playing and get yourself some of these cookies.

Check that out.

So I think the little boy on the left is showingus how not to use one of the little incense burners in front of The Great Buddha.

I don't think you're supposed to stick yourwhole face in there, I'm just saying.

It weighs about 103 tons and one ofthe ears alone is six foot three inches tall and I'm six foot two.

So one ear is like bigger than me.

So let's just walk around and take a look.

And it's made of bronze? So I wonder how much I could get for thatif I like .

.

.

That's a lot of pennies, isn't that bronze .

.

.

Wait, pennies are copper.

Wait a minute.

What's something bronze? Is bronze even worth anything? So it's hollow and I guess you can go inside, I don't think we're gonna do that today but yeah, it's got like the little ventilationholes in the back I guess.

That's the part that you don't see.

I wanted to share some cookies withyou.

And with you too, O.

So one for me, and one for you.

Cookie cheers? Boom.

Good as I remember.

Donnie: As always guys, thank you so muchfor watching.

I really really do appreciate it.

If you enjoyed this video, please don't forgetto let me know about it by commenting, liking, sharing and subscribing but only if you werefeeling it.

All right? And for those of you studying Japanese onyour own and you're looking for a community of other self study learners just like you, please join us a Japanese Mavericks, we'd love to have you.

And I'll leave a link to that in the descriptionbox below.

And make sure you don't miss the next video, because in the next one, we're gonna be eating some Kamakura street food.

And a special shout out to my good friendO, thank you so much for coming to Kamakura with me and being my cameraman and teacherfor the day.

And I'll finish with a question justto see how many of you guys are actually gonna jump in the comments and do it.

What do you want to see next? Let me know in the comment section below.

I don't care if it's funny, weird, strange, whatever the case may be, I look forward to hearing from you guys.

Peace.

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